Vir Cantium

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Category Archives: Race

If Oswald Mosley Had Fought Bradford West …

Imagine an alternative universe where a by-election had been held in a predominantly white constituency, which we shall call – just randomly, because it’s somewhere in the middle of the UK – Bradford West. (I did say alternative universe, remember).

Pick a race card ... any race card

Is it just plausible that some old ‘far right’ loon like Oswald Mosley might have put the following letter out to the electorate?

To voters of Anglo-Saxon heritage and English ascendancy in Bradford West:

God Save the Queen!

I have been increasingly angered by the dishonest and desperate efforts of the Labour campaign for Joe Bloggs, to deceive you about your vote.

You should vote for him because he is “British” they say, and because he is of Anglo-Saxon background.

Leaving aside the wisdom of a party running such a campaign in a constituency which contains thousands of people of many faiths and backgrounds, and in the name of the deputy leader of the council no less, let us look as this more closely.

God KNOWS who is British. And he KNOWS who is not. Instinctively, so do you. Let me point out to all the true English countrymen and women what I stand for:

I, Oswald Mosley, do not drink foreign beer and never have. Ask yourself if you believe the other candidate in this election can say that truthfully.

I, Oswald Mosley, have fought for the Anglo-Saxon way of life at home and abroad, all my life. And paid a price for it. I believe the other candidates in this election cannot say that truthfully.

I, Oswald Mosley, tell the truth, stand up for the truth, in parliament, on radio, on television, in the face of all its enemies, without fear, however powerful the are. Even in the US Senate, by the Grace of God. The truth and Mr Blair’s New Labour are passing strangers.

I, Oswald Mosley, hold Britain’s highest civil awards. The Knight of the British Empire. What has the other candidate ever done for Bradford West let alone Britain and England?

And, with your support, and if God wills it, I want to give my remaining days in the service of all the people – Whites, English and everyone in Bradford West. I await your sincere judgement on this matter.

God Save The Queen!

Sir Oswald Mosley

With apologies to George Galloway for the plagiarism … maybe.

H/T: Skip Licker for the inspiration.

The BNP’s Nick Griffin on Question Time: “Barrel”, “Fish” & “Shooting”

To be honest, I thought it was a bit of an anti-climax. Perhaps even, dare I say it, boring.

You would have thought that Griffin would have properly briefed himself, polished his answers and done his research. What we saw was that the BNP are amateurs. Just as their councillors have proven to be useless, so their leader was clearly out of his depth. Even when asked his views on the Holocaust, he failed in what many perceive to be the politician’s dark art of Avoiding The Question. As many suspected, he was given the oxygen of publicity and choked on it.

What made it somewhat boring, in my view, was that all but one of the questions were about the BNP (inevitably, I suppose). In supporting the principle of Griffin appearing (which I still do) I was rather hoping he would have his policies examined across the whole range of current issues. For instance, there wasn’t a question about the week’s major issue: the postal strikes. Such an issue would have given us a glimpse of the BNP policies beyond race and immigration – something which their spokesman on the Today programme did this morning with a short rant about privatisation that could have come out of the mouth of any CWU spokesman. It would also have revealed the inconvenient truth about the BNP: that once you strip away the immigration and race issues, you’d be hard pressed to tell the BNP from the Socialist Workers Party (or whatever they’re calling themselves this month).

Even so, it did give many people a laugh when Griffin defined indigenous Britons as those who have been here for 17,000 years. And that is often the best way to deal with these people: sometimes mockery is a far more powerful weapon than any form censorship or intellectual dissection.

Update: As KRO notes, the BNP’s website (you can work out the address, I’m not helping their Google rankings) has become strangely truncated.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown Talks Rubbish

I appreciate that headline ranks alongside “Pope Is Revealed as Catholic Shock” but sometimes the obvious does need to be stated.

YA-B was at it yesterday in the Evening Standard, talking about how undemocratic it is to allow a democratically elected party to air their views on television. Of course, it’s about the BNP and their appearance next week on Question Time.

Firstly, let me get the obligatory caveat out of the way: I do not support the BNP … abhorrent views … you know how it goes.

Right. Let’s have a look at Yasmin’s pearls of wisdom. I don’t have the time for a full fisking, and I suspect neither have you, so let’s pick out the highlights:

“The excuse used [for allowing them on] is that more than 900,000 people voted for the party during June’s European elections and the bulldoggish Griffin is now an MEP.”

It’s not an excuse Yasmin, it’s a reason. It’s called democracy. The annoying thing about democracy is that sometimes you don’t get the result you’d like. Take 1997 for example (of course, you wouldn’t).

“Yet this week two young BNP officials – who were allowed by the BBC to remain anonymous and unidentified as such – were brought on to Radio 1 to racially insult the footballer Ashley Cole – and they were not challenged once.”

Sometimes the examples of (left-wing) BBC bias are just sloppy journalism, and so it was, I suspect, with the “pro-BNP BBC bias” (it’s laughable just saying it) in that interview.

“Democracy, is it? To open the most respected TV programme in the land to those who would deny millions of us our democratic rights?”

Yes. Whereas you implicitly deny those 900,000 misguided souls who voted for the BNP their democratic right to see and hear from the second-raters they gave their support to.

“Jack Straw, Chris Huhne and Bonnie Greer should not have agreed to appear with any BNP representative on the show.”

Why? Because “no-platforming” them has worked so well up to now?

“For rational and reasonable arguments with bigots are wasted breath.”

Something we agree on. That’s worrying.

“I tried last Friday to argue passionately on BBC Radio 2 with UKIP’s Godfrey Bloom, who cheerfully calls his Asian contacts “Pakis” ….”

I was listening to that very programme. What struck me, apart from the cringe-worthy Godfrey Bloom, was Yasmin’s story about how she and a friend had got lost in a village in the countryside. After knocking on a few doors for help, unsuccessfully (the occupants were out), she found herself questioned by the police – presumably because someone had noticed strangers acting suspiciously. In Yasmin’s eyes, though, it was because this predominantly white village was naturally stuffed full of racists who had reported them for being non-white (or, to use her words “Pakis and terrorists”). Without a hint of irony, she was using the story as an illustration of racial prejudice (but not hers).

“Who next to debate with the great and good? A Ku Klux Klan leader? Holocaust denier David Irving? It would make a terrifically edgy programme.”

People like Irving need pity or ridicule, not a prison sentence. Far from being an edgy programme, I think it would give most decent people a good laugh.

Labour’s Inconvenient Truth

Amidst the déjà vu of another “race row” episode that has played out in the last day or so, with the errant candidate now departing the stage, it has been interesting to note Labour’s reaction. I’m not referring to the predictable “same old Tories” mantra. Nor just how the remarks have thrown into relief how well David Cameron has revived immigration as an issue in terms of the pressure on public services – an approach that has made his position immune to the “playing the race card” accusations. Nor how the candidate inadvisedly (in the current media environment) invoked the memory of Enoch Powell and that speech – even if there were a number of constituents in Halesown and Rowley Regis who do agree with old Enoch. If there is one British political figure the left hate more than Mrs Thatcher it is Powell.

No, Labour’s reaction has ignored the elephant in the room that any observer of recent electoral trends will know – that the old fashioned “send them all home” message resonates not so much with Conservatives, but with dyed in the wool working class socialists – the real old Labour. The inconvenient truth for Labour is that they have more to fear than the Conservatives when a BNP candidate stands in their ward/constituency – it is, after all, in the traditional Labour strongholds that the BNP have garnered most support – from Barking to Burnley.

Peter Hain has been quoted saying the remarks expose the Tories’ “racist underbelly”. Sorry Mr Hain, if there is a racist underbelly in politics today, you are more likely to find it among the hard left, not the Conservative heartlands.